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Activities and Seminars

Jesus M. Cortés. New results for linking brain structure to function: insights from Information Theory and Complex Networks Analysis.
 
Date: Feb 06, 2014

What: New results for linking brain structure to function: insights from Information Theory and Complex Networks Analysis.

Where: BCBL auditorium

Who: Jesus M. Cortés, Ikerbasque Research Professor, Computational Neuroimaging Lab, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Spain.

When: 12 noon


Modern neuroimaging methods can shed light on the basis of neuronal and cognitive specializations, with important implications for neuroscience and medicine. In particular, there is a growing interest in determining what aspects of brain function can be understood from what exact features of brain structure. In other words, how much one can learn about the rich complexity in brain function by looking separately to the different structural features? How much this structure-function prediction changes across brain areas ? To this aim, I will talk on recent results based on three different MRI acquisitions, the three performed to the same healthy subject (n=10). In concrete, we have performed high-resolution structural MRI, 32 gradients diffusion weighted images (DWIs) and resting state functional MRI (variations in the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent T2* signal). To extract brain networks we have considered the nodes to be the different regions of interest obtained by using both functional and anatomical parcellations of whole-brain (including both cortical and subcortical components). From the DWIs we have extracted 14 different structural networks by analyzing the bundles of parallel fibers. From the resting state fMRI we have obtained 4 different functional networks. Based on these data, I will show how  Information Theory allows to tackle the brain structure-function prediction problem by calculating how much information bits the functional networks are sharing with each of the structural networks and how this amount of shared information varies across different brain regions.
These results are (not published yet)  part of the PhD Thesis by Ibai Diez in the Computational Neuroimaging Lab at Biocruces http://www.biocruces.com/l1003